It seems that the Titanic was delicate and feeble both inside and out. This historian suggests that the Titanic’s hull was like tissue paper!

It seems that the Titanic was delicate and feeble both inside and out. This historian suggests that the Titanic’s hull was like tissue paper!

James Rhine takes us on a compelling journey that looks at the goings on with the Titanic well before and just after it collided with the infamous iceberg.

Rhine has discovered that the poor quality steel used to build the hull of the Titanic could be ruptured with minimal effort. Furthermore steel manufacturers in the U.K. informed Bruce Ismay [the overseeing executive of the White Start Line overseeing the Titanic’s construction] that this was the case. By implication they were saying that because of it’s size and weight the Titanic needed a special type of steel to be safe.

Rhine says that Ismay was more concerned about cost cutting and furthermore he knew that the Titanic was already on fire as it headed off to New York on it’s maiden voyage on April 10th 1912. Eleven fireman were then trying to extinguish a fire in one of the Titanic’s coal bunkers. This further weakened the Titanic’s already vulnerable steel hull. An engine room worker named John Dilley said at the time “There were hundreds of tons of coal stored there. We made no headway against it … we didn’t get the fire out … from the day we sailed, the Titanic was on fire …”

In other words Rhine seems to be telling us that even well before it set sail the Titanic was a disaster waiting to happen. This link will take you the original Rhine’s article. Click here for a more “tidy” version of the same work.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *